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Spam Block

  Unsolicited Bulk Email noun. 'Unsolicited' means that the recipient has not given verifiable permission for the message to be sent. 'Bulk' means that the message is sent as part of a larger collection of messages, all having basically identical content.

Although there still seem to be some differences among the US Government, the lawmakers, the antispam organizations and the spammers regarding what is spam and what is not, identifying it is actually pretty easy: if you did not ask for it, you did not sign up on a mailing list related to it, and did not leave your e-mail address on a web form asking for more information on it…it's spam! The spam issue is not about content, but solely about delivery method. The content of spam is and has always been irrelevant.
Again, if it is sent unsolicited and in bulk, it is spam plain and simple.

Sure we want spam to stop. Nobody wants their e-mail address cycling around from spammer to spammer. We can delete it, but have you ever stopped to consider how much time we actually spend each day hitting the 'Delete' button? We should not have to beg to be removed from something we did not ask to be put on in the first place! So where do we draw the line? When do we start thinking it is not worth logging into our email account to read our messages? Despite the effort of thousands of angry spam victims pushing for stronger laws against spammers over the last few years, not much progress has been done in this respect. Moreover, in January 2004 the U.S.
Government has passed the CANSPAM Act, a law backed overwhelmingly by spammers and large corporations, because it legalized spamming instead of banning it. With the passage of CAN-SPAM, spamming has become legal throughout the United States. Now 23 million U.S. businesses can all begin spamming email addresses as long as they give users a way to opt-out. What CAN-SPAM makes illegal is the use of open proxies or any form of resource misappropriation as well as use of false headers, which for the top spammers to avoid is business as usual.
We will not argue here about the motives of the US law makers to pass the CAN-SPAM, but rather focus on the problem of doing something about the spam in your mailbox. By doing more than "just hitting delete", you are helping to solve the problem. We should all exercise our right of control, or we will lose it.

 

The million dollar question is whether it is possible to stop spam. The most honest answer to this question is probably not -- but you can significantly reduce it. Below are some clear and simple tips to greatly reduce the amount of spam you get:
Many of us get thousands of spam messages a day. In fact, Scam Busters gets many more than that. And one of our friends gets a staggering 250,000 spam messages each day! Yikes...
So, it's not surprising that people need relief -- they want to do whatever they can to stop spam.

Unfortunately, many of us now spend so much time filtering and deleting spam that our biggest concern has become that we not lose messages we really want.

Many double opt-in email newsletters are being incorrectly filtered, so recipients who sign up never know they've been sent. And even personal communication and one-on-one email is now regularly being filtered at the server level.

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